KEY POINTS: TRAUMATIC SEPARATION AND REFUGEE AND IMMIGRANT CHILDREN

Provides key points related to traumatic separation and immigrant and refugee children, adapted from the NCTSN fact sheet Children with Traumatic Separation: Information for Professionals.

2018 National Child Traumatic Stress Network

 

Click to access document

Published in Children's Justice Act

Resource Description

Provides tips for current caregivers and others to help address the needs of immigrant and refugee children who have experienced traumatic separation. The relationship with a parent is critical to a child’s sense of self, safety, and trust. Separations from parents and siblings— especially under sudden, chaotic, or unpredictable circumstances such as those related to war, refugee, immigration, or detention experiences—may lead children to develop depression, anxiety, or separation-related traumatic stress symptoms. This tip sheet outlines what children of different ages might be experiencing and how caregivers and others can help.

Published in 2018 - National Child Traumatic Stress Network
 
 
Published in Children's Justice Act

This guide is intended to equip State, Tribal, and Territorial child welfare managers and administrators — as well as family support organizations — with current information about effective strategies for developing data-driven family support servicesi and research findings to help them make the case for implementing and sustaining these services. Download the Support Matters guidebook.

This guide was created by AdoptUSKids.

Attaining legal permanence is not always about finding a new family. In some instances, it is about legally re-defining roles of existing family members or establishing legal relationships with other adults who have a family-like relationship with children through guardianship. Although different from adoption, the adjustment to these newly defined responsibilities can be just as complicated, including the need to address children’s trauma and the changes in family dynamics. Social service professionals can better serve guardianship families by learning about the dynamics of the family’s permanent relationships, factors that influenced their decision-making in choosing the guardianship option, and how those decisions might affect the family’s current situation. Data on children exiting to guardianship from foster care can be found at https://www.acf. hhs.gov/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/afcars

Download and/or access the factsheet.

This month (June) is Reunification Month—a good time to celebrate family and redouble our efforts to make it possible for more families to be supported in achieving permanency through reunification. As an organization that focuses on older youth, Juvenile Law Center is interested in supporting and expanding ways that safe and sustainable reunification can occur for older youth, including youth who are just entering or at risk of entering the foster care system and young people who have been in care for some period of time, even years. This is the right thing to do because we know achieving permanency will improve transition outcomes, but it is also urgent given the demographics of the child welfare system: in 2016, for example, 22% of youth who entered foster care were age 13 or older.   

Read the rest of the article - click here. 

Blog Post by: Jennifer Pokempner, Child Welfare Policy Director, Juvenile Law Center; Dominique Mikell, Stoneleigh Fellow, Juvenile Law Center; Jennifer Rodriguez, Executive Director, Youth Law Center,

SAMHSA Child Mental Health Event Promotes Trauma-Informed Approach

Psychiatric News (American Psychiatric Association) - June 08, 2018

Mental health is essential to a child’s healthy development. That was the message highlighted this year by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) during National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day last month. To mark the day, SAMHSA hosted a special event at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., under the theme “Partnering for Health and Hope Following Trauma.” The event brought together governors’ spouses, senior federal officials, and organization executives representing the fields of primary care, behavioral health, and child welfare, including APA and the APA Foundation, for an interactive town hall. The event also featured trauma survivors, youth who had experienced mental illness, and their family members.

"Young people who have experienced trauma are more likely to develop mental health conditions such as anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders, McCance-Katz said. "We also know that trauma increases the probability that young people will develop physical problems like cardiovascular diseases later in life." Trauma, she said, includes adverse childhood experiences such as sexual, physical, and other kinds of abuse.

A new report by SAMHSA indicates that 82 percent of children receiving community-based mental health services have had traumatic experiences. After receiving services through SAMHSA’s Children’s Mental Health Initiative (CMHI), which addresses the needs of children, youth, and young adults with serious emotional disturbance, suicidal thoughts among those who experienced trauma decreased by 68 percent, and suicide attempts decreased by 78 percent. In addition, the number of arrests declined while school attendance and performance improved.

“Evidence-based, trauma-informed care models such as those supported by SAMHSA are effective in improving outcomes for children and youth,” McCance-Katz said.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE - CLICK HERE

RESOURCES: 

Also: Improving Life Outcomes for Children with History of Mental Health Challenges and Trauma (Press release): https://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/press-announcements/201805090400

Also: Helping Children and Youth Who Have Traumatic Experiences (SAMHSA report): https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/brief_report_natl_childrens_mh_awareness_day.pdf

https://psychnews.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.pn.2018.6b17

Published in Children's Justice Act

OJJDP has released the spring 2018 issue of The AMBER Advocate newsletter. This issue features articles on:

• AMBER Alert Training and Technical Assistance Program Administrator Jim Walters' vision for the future of child protection.
• Faces of the AMBER Alert Network.
• The role an Idaho AMBER Alert played in the recovery of two sisters.
• AMBER Alert in Indian Country.
• AMBER Alert in international news.

The U.S. Department of Justice and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children coordinate the AMBER Alert program nationally. As of March 2018, a total of 924 children had been successfully recovered through the AMBER Alert system.

Resources:

Find AMBER Alert on Facebook.

OJJDP has released the spring 2018 issue of The AMBER Advocate newsletter. This issue features articles on:

• AMBER Alert Training and Technical Assistance Program Administrator Jim Walters' vision for the future of child protection.
• Faces of the AMBER Alert Network.
• The role an Idaho AMBER Alert played in the recovery of two sisters.
• AMBER Alert in Indian Country.
• AMBER Alert in international news.

The U.S. Department of Justice and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children coordinate the AMBER Alert program nationally. As of March 2018, a total of 924 children had been successfully recovered through the AMBER Alert system.

Resources:

Find AMBER Alert on Facebook.

The Capacity Building Center for Courts has created a Domestic Child Sex Trafficking Judicial Desk Reference Guide.  This resource provides links and examples of how Court Improvement Programs (CIP) can implement P.L. 113-183.  Specifically, it addresses:

 

How to form a 113-183 Task Force

 

How to measure your success as a 113-183 Task Force

 

How to identify victims and potential victims of Trafficking

 

How to identify and provide services for victims/potential victims of Trafficking

 

How to be (Trafficking) Trauma-Informed and how to conduct a Trauma audit of your court

 

The PDF version is attached here and the web link to the resource is: file:///C:/Users/lesli/Downloads/113-183BenchReference-_ColorFixed-md4_jd4_cm-md-QF.PDF

 

Take Care,

 

Leslie Briner, MSW

P.L. 113-183 Sex Trafficking Constituency Group Lead

CAPACITY BUILDING CENTER FOR STATES

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Sociopathic parents exist and can cause great harm to their children through both emotional and physical abuse, even to the point of producing sociopathic children. In addition, co-parenting with a sociopath can be very troubling.

sociopath is a man or a woman who cares only about him/herself (What Is A Sociopathic Person Like?). All the world is his stage, and all the people merely his puppets on a string. He is a social predator in all aspects of his life, including parenthood; he's a sociopathic parent.

Read the full article, click here: https://www.healthyplace.com/personality-disorders/sociopath/sociopathic-parents-and-their-effects-on-children/ 

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