Tuesday, 09 October 2018 10:31

Knowing the Signs of Youth Sex Trafficking

How You Can Help

Human trafficking is one of the greatest issues the world faces today, and cases today are typically based in historical trauma. Native communities know this especially to be true. It is no secret that ever since European settlers arrived and encroached upon Native lands, Native individuals have been trafficked. Today, many reservations attract outside visitors who would solicit trafficked victims, especially with the rise of casinos. It is ultimately up to the community to recognize the signs, and to take what steps they can to help remedy this dire issue. In this resource, you will learn some of the common signs of a trafficked victim and what you can do to help. There is also some information that can be used and shared to prevent becoming a victim in the first place. While it is the responsibility of law enforcement to apprehend those who perpetuate human trafficking activities, it is the moral responsibility of all people to report a situation if they feel like someone is being trafficked.

Abstract 

PDF

 

Mentoring for Youth with Backgrounds of Involvement in Commercial Sex Activity

National Mentoring Resource Center Population Review

Author: David L DuBois and Jennifer K. Felner

Published January 2016

Abstract   PDF 

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

American's Children in Brief - Key National Indicators of Well-Being 2018

This year’s America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being continues more than a decade of dedication and collaboration by agencies across the Federal Government to advance our understanding of our Nation’s children and what may be needed to bring them a better tomorrow. We hope you find this report useful. The Forum will be releasing its next full report in 2019. Nancy Potok, Chief Statistician, U.S. Office of Management and Budget Introduction The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (Forum) was chartered in 1997 by the authority of Executive Order No. 13045. The Forum fosters collaboration among 23 Federal agencies that (1) produce and/or use statistical data on children,1 and (2) seek to improve Federal data on those children.

Each year, the Forum publishes a report on the well-being of children. This series of reports, entitled America’s Children, provides accessible compilations of well-being indicators drawn from the most reliable Federal statistics. A goal of the series is to make Federal data on children available in a nontechnical, easy-to-use format to stimulate discussion among data providers, policymakers, and the public. The Forum alternates publishing a detailed report, America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, with a shorter report, America’s Children in Brief. In some years, America’s Children in Brief highlights selected indicators while other editions focus on a particular topic and measures of child well-being not featured in the detailed report.

America’s Children in Brief, 2018 describes selected characteristics of children whose well-being may be at highest risk. Conceptual Framework for Key National Indicators The Forum has identified 41 key national indicators collected by Federal agencies that describe the well-being of children. The indicators are updated annually on the Forum’s website (https://childstats.gov), pending data availability. These indicators span seven domains: Family and Social Environment, Economic Circumstances, Health Care, Physical Environment and Safety, Behavior, Education, and Health. In addition, they must meet the following criteria: „ Easy to understand by broad audiences; „ Objectively based on reliable data with substantive research connecting them to child well-being; „ Balanced, so that no single area of children’s lives dominates the report; „ Measured regularly, so that they can be updated and show trends over time; and „ Representative of large segments of the population, rather than one particular group. In compiling these 41 indicators, the Forum carefully examines the available data while also seeking input from the Federal policymaking community, foundations, academic researchers, and state and local children’s service providers. America’s Children in Brief, 2018 concludes with a summary table displaying the most recent data for all 41 key national indicators in America’s Children at a Glance.

Monday, 01 October 2018 14:00

October is Internet Safety Month

Special Feature: Internet Safety

typing on computer keyboard

Cyber-enabled attacks take an enormous toll on American businesses, government agencies, and families.

In 2017, the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) received a total of 301,580 complaints, with reported losses exceeding $1.4 billion. Criminals have been able to exploit the popularity of social networking and online commerce to commit a variety of crimes, including internet fraud, child exploitation, identity theft, and elder financial exploitation.

Faced with the growing threat of cyber crime, it is crucial for state and local police agencies to invest in cyber programs. From the standpoint of a criminal, cyber crime is a relatively low-risk crime that has the potential for enormous rewards. Until police agencies become adept at preventing and investigating cyber crime, there may not be significant deterrents to thwart cyber crime relative to other types of crime.

But cyber investigations and the prevention of cyber crime pose special challenges to law enforcement agencies. Malicious software and other cyber tools used to perpetrate crimes are sold in forums and chat rooms on the dark web, which provides for anonymity. In addition to dealing with these threats, law enforcement must also build secure and resilient information systems to support their operations and address the exponential growth in digital evidence and forensic investigations.

Since the nature of the internet is so anonymous, it is easy for people to misrepresent themselves and manipulate or trick other users. Young children and teenagers are particularly vulnerable to criminal acts because they are often trusting, naïve, and curious. Children must be taught to be careful about the information that they share online and the sites that they visit.

Technology can also be misused by abusers and perpetrators in more personal crimes of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, elder financial exploitation, and human trafficking. Stalkers are increasingly using a variety of computer technologies to harass, terrify, intimidate, coerce, and monitor former and current family members and intimate partners.

While technology has greatly enhanced our ability to connect with others around the world and conduct business regardless of our location, it has also exposed us to a variety of scams. Each time we connect to the internet, we make decisions affecting our cybersecurity.

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, an opportunity to review best practices in protecting personal information online and learning more to ensure that you and your family are safe online.

Visit the following pages for additional resources from the Office of Justice Programs and other federal sources:

OJJDP Resources - Published on October 1, 2018 - https://www.ncjrs.gov/internetsafety/?utm_source=justinfo&utm_medium=email&utm_content=internetsafetysf&utm_campaign=cybersecmth2018 

Published in Children's Justice Act

As you plan for National Bullying Prevention Month in October, the US Office of Juvenile Justice - Victims of Crime Office offer several resources:

 

Published in Home Page

Title: State Practices in Treatment/Therapeutic Foster Care. 
Author(s): Seibert, Julie.;Feinberg, Rose.;Ayub, Asha.;Helburn, Amy.;Gibbs, Deborah. 
Published: 2018 
Available from: Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) 
http://aspe.hhs.gov/ 
Room 415F 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
200 Independence Av, SW 
Washington, DC 20201 

Printable version (PDF): https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/259121/TREATMENTFOSTERCARE.pdf

Abstract: This federally funded report presents findings from an investigation into how therapeutic foster care (TFC) is implemented and supported by States. Information for the report comes from key informant interviews, representing a variety of perspectives on TFC, and a review of relevant literature. The report provides an overview of the key program elements of TFC defined by States and how States differentiate TFC from foster care. The report also provides a description of how States provide adjunct services, such as case management and behavioral health services to children in TFC. Finally, the report includes information on the different funding strategies employed by States to support TFC services. Findings indicate key elements of TFC include highly skilled caregivers (TFC parents) who are part of the child’s treatment team, enhanced case management, and coordinated delivery of behavioral health and other community-based services. The study also found that although TFC may be a cost-effective alternative to residential care, funding challenges limit its use in many States. States typically fund TFC using Medicaid funds for clinical and therapeutic services and Title IV-E funds for daily care of eligible children. TFC may also be supported with funds from state child welfare, juvenile justice and behavioral health agencies, and provider agency fundraising. Finally, the study found States have employed a variety of strategies to increase Medicaid funding for TFC, such as defining TFC as a service in the state Medicaid plan, categorizing TFC as a rehabilitative service, and using waivers authorized by Section 1115 and Titles 1915(b) and (c) of the Social Security Act. The report concludes TFC is successfully utilized by several States as an alternative to congregate care. Appendices include State profiles. 6 references. 

Trauma-informed care integrates an understanding of the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and their impact on lifelong health. The science of early brain development reveals that the environment in which children develop—family, community, and culture—impacts brain development, health, and genetics. In the medical home, being trauma-informed is important for prevention and amelioration of this impact.

Title: Trauma-Informed Primary Care: Prevention, Recognition, and Promoting Resilience.
Author(s): Earls, Marian F.
Published: 2018
Journal Name: NCMJ (North Carolina Medical Journal)
v. 79, 2, March-April 2018, p. 108-112
Available from: NCMJ (North Carolina Medical Journal)
PDF: http://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/content/79/2/108.full.pdf+html
Abstract: This commentary explains trauma-informed care integrates an understanding of the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and their impact on lifelong health. It notes the science ...

Children Placed in Foster Care Because of Substance Use Now More Likely to Go to Relatives than Non-relatives, A Report Finds

The recently updated report from Generations United, Raising Children of the Opioid Epidemic: Solutions and Support for Grandfamilies, shows that -- overall -- foster care systems are relying more on grandparents and other relatives to care for children when their parents cannot. The report includes recommendations on how to connect grandfamilies to the same supports and services that traditional unrelated foster families receive. Read the release, then see the updated report

To prevent youth opioid misuse, many states are more effectively regulating prescriptions

SEP 04, 2018
AUTHORS: ANDRA WILKINSON, HANNAH WINSLOW

The majority of people who misuse drugs start before their 18th birthday. Furthermore, the risk of addiction increases when drug use starts in adolescence, making this period a key prevention window. Leftover prescription pills, either from one’s own prescription or those of family or friends, are the dominant source of opioid pain relievers for adolescents who misuse them.[1] By the end of high school, approximately 13 percent of teens will have misused opioid pain relievers (i.e., used them without prescription, in a manner not prescribed, or to get high). Strategies that address adolescent misuse of prescription opioid pain relievers represent a critical component of any successful effort to address the opioid crisis.

A national study of 12th graders found that, among those with no prior history of drug use and strong disapproval of illegal drug use, a prescription for opioids in high school was associated with a threefold increased risk of later opioid misuse. Opioid pain reliever misuse can substantially increase the risk of initiating heroin use. As such, decreasing excessive opioid prescribing and lowering the number of leftover pills are important strategies for preventing opioid pain reliever misuse—and, potentially, later heroin or fentanyl (a more powerful and lethal synthetic opioid) use among youth.

Adolescent outreach and education is necessary but not sufficient for prevention. To prevent adolescent misuse, many states have implemented policies designed to limit unnecessary prescribing. Recent legislative efforts have included the following strategies:

Despite their effectiveness at reducing misuse, policies targeting the supply of prescription opioids have met varying degrees of resistance. In recent years, opioid prescribing has dropped. Teen prescription opioid and heroin use is now at a historic low, fueling concerns that these new policies may not be necessary, and that poorly implemented policies can—and are—harming terminal patients and those with chronic pain. Furthermore, increased regulation of prescription opioids generally correlates with upticks in heroin use. Ohio, the state with the second-highest opioid overdose death rate, has in recent years passed legislation that includes all three of the previously mentioned policy approaches. In subsequent years, the state saw opioid prescribing fall 20 percent, while its overall overdose death rate continued to rise as the proportion of deaths due to heroin and fentanyl increased.

However, the relationship observed between decreasing supplies of prescription opioids and increases in heroin use is complex, and research shows that the overall increase in heroin use began long before efforts to decrease opioid prescribing. For this reason, lawmakers should consider ways to expand treatment while taking careful steps to limit supply, as confirmed by a recent predictive model. Although prescribing has dropped overall, it still varies considerably across states; for example, certain states have prescribing rates more than twice as high as their neighbors. Some researchers also assert that state policies are important for continued declines in prescription opioid use among youth.

Policies regulating access to prescription opioids are certainly not a cure-all, but they do provide an opportunity for policymakers to intervene before youth addiction begins. As prescription pain relievers continue to be one of the most common drugs of choice for first-time users in adolescence, state policy initiatives to reduce excessive prescribing may be a powerful tool for lawmakers. However, to ensure that prescription opioid regulation corresponds with decreases in overdose deaths, policies limiting supply must not harm chronic pain patients and must go hand-in-hand with expanded and comprehensive addiction treatment.

[1] Child Trends analyses of the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

[2] State policies related to opioid prescribing change rapidly. For the most up-to-date information, please consult http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/injury-prevention-legislation-database.aspx.

 
Published in Children's Justice Act

A newly revised field manual, Child Protection in Families Experiencing Domestic Violence, is now available. The manual reflects recent practice innovations, the latest research and data, and a greater emphasis on family preservation and in-home services.

The comprehensive user manual informs child protective services (CPS) workers, supervisors, and related professionals on multiple issues related to the co-occurrence of child maltreatment and domestic violence. The newly revised edition reflects the Children's Bureau commitment to a collaborative and community-based approach to child protection and offers guidance on:

  • Ensuring the safety of children in incidents of domestic violence
  • Ensuring domestic violence survivor safety
  • Perpetrator accountability
  • Agency response

The updated manual also addresses the following practice issues:

  • Guidelines for assessing families experiencing domestic violence
  • Perpetrators of domestic violence
  • Adult survivors and child witnesses
  • Complexity of children's issues and trauma-focused approach
  • Safety and wellness for CPS workers
  • Building collaborative responses for families experiencing domestic violence

The revised manual is part of the Children's Bureau Child Abuse and Neglect User Manual Series—last updated in 2003—and serves as a companion piece to Child Protective Services: A Guide for Caseworkers, a second revised manual in the series. The updated manuals from the U.S. Department of Health and Services' Children's Bureau Office on Child Abuse and Neglect are available at https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanuals.

For a series of tip sheets on how to respond to families experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment—including general practice recommendations, suggestions for engaging families, and guidance on documentation, assessment, decision-making, and planning—see the Child Welfare Capacity Building Center for States' Domestic Violence and the Child Welfare Professional Series at https://capacity.childwelfare.gov/states/focus-areas/child-protection/domestic-violence.

Published in Children's Justice Act
Page 1 of 3

Upcoming Events

October

November

December