2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Support.
National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth (NCFY). Runaway and Homeless Youth Program, Family and Youth Services Bureau. National Runaway Safeline (NRS).
2017
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/fysb/nrs_crisis_contacts_report_1.pdf

A new report completed by Child Trends, under contract to the Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation at the Administration for Children and Families, examines Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education (HMRE) programs. HMRE programs aim to help youth form healthy relationships and, eventually, healthy marriages (and avoid unhealthy ones) by improving their attitudes, knowledge, skills, and expectations around romantic relationships. This report builds on research that finds that young people's romantic relationships can influence their behaviors and experiences (both positive and negative) during adolescence and beyond.

The report finds that most HMRE programs target and reach diverse-and often disadvantaged-youth populations in a variety of settings. However, these reach more youth ages 14 to 17 than in the 18 to 24 age range, which leads the authors to recommend providing more programs targeted at older youth. Read more about the report's findings and recommendations at acf.hhs.gov.

 

Why Understanding Racial Bias is Crucial for the Responsible Use of Predictive Analytics

Chronicle of Social Change - June 09, 2017

As big data tools like predictive analytics become more prevalent, child-welfare agencies must grapple with implicit racial bias if they want to ensure that it does not cause harm, according to a new white paper published last month by the Kirwan Institute at Ohio State University.

Foretelling the Future: A Critical Perspective on the Use of Predictive Analytics in Child Welfare: http://kirwaninstitute.osu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/ki-predictive-analytics.pdf

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/research-news/understanding-racial-bias-crucial-responsible-use-predictive-analytics/27179

Polaris released the 2016 data from the National Human Trafficking Hotline and Polaris's BeFree Textline. In 2016, 8,042 cases of human trafficking were reported to the National Hotline and Polaris. Since 2007, 33,680 trafficking cases have been reported through the National Hotline and Polaris's BeFree Textline, comprising the largest available dataset on human trafficking in the U.S.

Download a summary of the National Human Trafficking Hotline and BeFree statistics here.

Reports of human trafficking to the National Hotline and BeFree Textline jumped by 35% in the last year -- an increase that many of you likely felt as you found shelter, investigated cases, provided legal services, or gave local support to thousands of victims across the country. Polaris has been especially encouraged by the fact that more victims and survivors are reaching out directly to the hotlines than ever. In 2016, 24% more survivors contacted the National Human Trafficking Hotline and BeFree Textline for help than in 2015, meaning that more survivors know that we can effectively identify their needs and connect them to you to receive the support they need.

Poloaris is releasing more detailed data about victims than in years past, such as their race and ethnicity. The data also spotlight factors that may have placed these victims at risk, as well as the variety of tactics used to recruit and trap them in a trafficking situation. The 2016 data better illuminate how survivors were most often recruited for sex trafficking (through intimate partners, family members, and those posing as a benefactor) and labor trafficking (through fraudulent job offers and false promises). Additionally, Polaris has stated they are gaining a better understanding of the different ways that victims access the outside world, which helps pinpoint systems where victims could find the support they need to leave their traffickers.

Download the Summary Sheet here. Or check out the updated National Human Trafficking Hotline statistics online, including state-based information, at www.humantraffickinghotline.org/statistics.

Kids Share 2016 report cover

Kids’ Share 2016 is the tenth annual analysis of federal spending and tax investments in children and families. The report finds the children’s share of the budget is projected to be vastly outweighed by interest that will be paid on the national debt. Kids’ Share 2016 projects that absent any policy change, children’s share of the budget will continue to decline. Kids’ Share 2016 offers these detailed analysis on the federal budget, and more. The report was commissioned by First Focus and produced by the Urban Institute with support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Download the report.

Published in Data & Technology
For most young people, family is there to lend a hand with things like rent, groceries, and support as they make the first few steps into adulthood. Unless they’ve been in foster care. Fostering Change commissioned this research to provide an economic perspective on the challenges and opportunities associated with youth aging out of government care. Over three reports we consider:
 
(1) current educational, economic, social and wellness outcomes;
(2) the costs of those outcomes; and
(3) the costs of increased supports in relation to the potential savings and benefits they offer.
 
This series of reports offers important new insights into the economic consequences and issues for youth aging out of care. To our knowledge, no previous study in BC has attempted to estimate the costs of current outcomes and the potential benefits from better preparing and supporting youth from care in the early years of their adulthood.
 
The findings are very clear. First, youth aging out of government care do not receive the same financial, social and other supports that most young people receive from their parents. Second, educational, economic, social and wellness outcomes are poor for many youth aging out of government care. Third, the immediate and long-term costs of these adverse outcomes are very high — hundreds of millions of dollars every year. Last, the cost of increased supports is small relative to the potential savings and benefits to youth from care, and to society as a whole.
OPPORTUNITIES IN TRANSITION:
An Economic Analysis of Investing
in Youth Aging out of Foster Care
READ THE FULL REPORT, CLICK HERE.
Published in Data & Technology
Wednesday, 20 July 2016 10:12

A Practitioner’s Guide to Cost Analysis

The FRIENDS National Center is pleased to announce the addition of a cost analysis page to their website.  On the webpage you will find four briefs that address a three-part framework that were originally released in November, 2015.  The framework was developed in partnership with the Center for Public Partnerships and Research (KU-CPPR) at the University of Kansas (KU-CPPR), and was based on interviews with ten CBCAP State Leads.  State Leads shared their experiences collecting data, identifying stakeholders, and conducting other activities in preparation for analyzing costs related to program activities and outcomes.

As a follow-up to the briefs, a Practitioner’s Guide to Cost Analysis:  First Steps & Cost Analysis Case Study from Children’s Trust Fund of Missouri has been released and is also available on the website, http://friendsnrc.org/activities-that-support-collaboration/cost-analysis.

This new Guide offers:

  • A map to follow in determining where to start with this type of work
  • Recommended action steps for each element of the three-part framework
  • Experiences from CBCAP State Leads shared in the interviews
  • A description of storytelling through numbers, or using social math
  • A detailed case study outlining the experience and results of a cost analysis conducted of CBCAP funded services by the Children’s Trust Fund in Missouri
  • An appendix with additional resources

 

Published in Data & Technology

Today, Polaris released the 2015 data from the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) hotline and Polaris's BeFree Textline. In 2015, 5,973 cases of human trafficking were reported to the NHTRC and Polaris. In total, 25,696 trafficking cases have been reported through the NHTRC and Polaris's BeFree Texline since December 2007, establishing the largest data set on human trafficking in the United States. Many people have been directly involved in these 25,000 cases.

Download a summary of the NHTRC and BeFree statistics here.

Total reported cases to the NHTRC increased by 10% since 2014, with a 15% increase in reported sex trafficking cases. While the cases of labor trafficking reported to the NHTRC decreased from 818 in 2014 to 712 in 2015, we largely attribute this decline to a chronic lack of awareness of labor trafficking within the United States.

The NHTRC and BeFree hotlines serve a variety of individuals, but the primary goal is to reach as many victims and survivors as possible to ensure they can be connected to help if they want it. Over the past year, 1,636 survivors of sex and labor trafficking sent calls, texts, emails, and webforms to the hotlines -- a 24% increase over 2014. More women, children, and men who have found themselves in trafficking situations are reaching out and receiving life-changing services and support.

But the NHTRC isn't just a lifeline for survivors, it's a useful tool for stopping traffickers, too. A new groundbreaking report from Northeastern University found that requiring the NHTRC number to be posted in public areas was the most effective way to increase the number of human trafficking arrests. Since 2007, the NHTRC has provided over 6,500 tips to law enforcement, including 1,400 in 2015.

Thank you for being a valuable partner in the fight against human trafficking. It is an honor to work alongside you. We look forward to continuing to support your efforts to not only respond to trafficking in your community, but ultimately, eradicate it as well.

With our best from Polaris,

Audrey Roofeh
Director of Advisory Services

Tuesday, 20 October 2015 00:00

KIDS COUNT Data Book 2015

The KIDS COUNT Data Book is an annual publication that assesses child well-being nationally and across the 50 states, as well as in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Using an index of 16 indicators, the report ranks states on overall child well-being and in economic well-being, education, health and family and community.

The 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book focuses on America’s children in the midst of the country's economic recovery. While data show improvements in child health and education, more families are struggling to make ends meet, and a growing number of kids live in high-poverty neighborhoods. In addition to ranking states in several areas of child well-being, the report also examines the influence of parents’ education, health and other life circumstances on their children.

July 21, 2015

Published in Data & Technology

America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2015 is a compendium of indicators depicting the condition of our Nation’s young people. The report, the 17th in an ongoing series, presents 41 key indicators on important aspects of children’s lives. These indicators are drawn from our most reliable Federal statistics, are easily understood by broad audiences, are objectively based on substantial research, are balanced so that no single area of children’s lives dominates the report, are measured often to show trends over time, and are representative of large segments of the population rather than one particular group. http://www.childstats.gov/pdf/ac2015/ac_15.pdf

Published in Home Page

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