Trauma-informed care integrates an understanding of the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and their impact on lifelong health. The science of early brain development reveals that the environment in which children develop—family, community, and culture—impacts brain development, health, and genetics. In the medical home, being trauma-informed is important for prevention and amelioration of this impact.

Title: Trauma-Informed Primary Care: Prevention, Recognition, and Promoting Resilience.
Author(s): Earls, Marian F.
Published: 2018
Journal Name: NCMJ (North Carolina Medical Journal)
v. 79, 2, March-April 2018, p. 108-112
Available from: NCMJ (North Carolina Medical Journal)
PDF: http://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/content/79/2/108.full.pdf+html
Abstract: This commentary explains trauma-informed care integrates an understanding of the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and their impact on lifelong health. It notes the science ...

Thursday, 13 September 2018 15:40

Five Steps to a Stronger Child Welfare Workforce

Five Steps to a Stronger Child Welfare Workforce (Press release)

Annie E. Casey Foundation - September 12, 2018

The five-step process described in this paper comes from On the Frontline, the Annie E. Casey Foundation's three-year effort to measurably improve the leading edge of the child welfare workforce: its child protection staff, including investigations caseworkers and supervisors.

Report: : https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-fivestepstoastrongerchildwelfare-2018.pdf

https://youthtoday.org/2018/09/five-steps-to-a-stronger-child-welfare-workforce/

Published in Children's Justice Act

A newly revised field manual, Child Protection in Families Experiencing Domestic Violence, is now available. The manual reflects recent practice innovations, the latest research and data, and a greater emphasis on family preservation and in-home services.

The comprehensive user manual informs child protective services (CPS) workers, supervisors, and related professionals on multiple issues related to the co-occurrence of child maltreatment and domestic violence. The newly revised edition reflects the Children's Bureau commitment to a collaborative and community-based approach to child protection and offers guidance on:

  • Ensuring the safety of children in incidents of domestic violence
  • Ensuring domestic violence survivor safety
  • Perpetrator accountability
  • Agency response

The updated manual also addresses the following practice issues:

  • Guidelines for assessing families experiencing domestic violence
  • Perpetrators of domestic violence
  • Adult survivors and child witnesses
  • Complexity of children's issues and trauma-focused approach
  • Safety and wellness for CPS workers
  • Building collaborative responses for families experiencing domestic violence

The revised manual is part of the Children's Bureau Child Abuse and Neglect User Manual Series—last updated in 2003—and serves as a companion piece to Child Protective Services: A Guide for Caseworkers, a second revised manual in the series. The updated manuals from the U.S. Department of Health and Services' Children's Bureau Office on Child Abuse and Neglect are available at https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanuals.

For a series of tip sheets on how to respond to families experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment—including general practice recommendations, suggestions for engaging families, and guidance on documentation, assessment, decision-making, and planning—see the Child Welfare Capacity Building Center for States' Domestic Violence and the Child Welfare Professional Series at https://capacity.childwelfare.gov/states/focus-areas/child-protection/domestic-violence.

Published in Children's Justice Act

Matching Service to Need: How Family Drug Courts Identify, Assess and Support Families to Achieve Recovery, Safety, and Permanency: A Practice Brief.
Children and Family Futures (Organization)
2016
Sponsoring Organization: United States. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

http://www.cffutures.org/files/Matching_Service_to_Need.pdf

Thursday, 23 August 2018 12:46

Data Sharing: Courts and Child Welfare

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families (ACF) offers this technical assistance guidance to courts and child welfare agencies to assist and support the creation of automated, bi-directional (two-way) data exchanges between their respective information systems. This document summarizes the benefits of data exchanges, identifies data categories to consider in data-sharing agreements, provides tips for overcoming common challenges, and highlights examples of successfully operating state and locally administered data exchanges. The information and recommendations herein do not establish requirements or supersede existing laws or official guidance.

Link to guide.

Published in Data & Technology

The All Children - All Families Webinar Series kicks off tomorrow, August 1st at 3:00 PM ET with our introductory 90-minute offering on LGBTQ competency for child welfare professionals. This webinar, along with our two other core offerings on serving LGBTQ parents and LGBTQ youth, will be presented live monthly from August to March and available on demand. All three core webinars provide 1.5 CE credits from NASW at a cost of $40/webinar. Click here to register and learn more about purchasing CEs. Note: Employees at ACAF participating agencies are eligible for a 50% discount on CEs. If your agency participates in ACAF, ask your team’s ACAF leads for the discount code to submit at time of purchase. Not sure if your agency is eligible? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or request to participate today.

Looking for in-person staff training? ACAF’s 3-part training series is also eligible for NASW CE credit -- up to 18 hours! Learn more at hrc.im/acaf-training. Sponsored by the Human Rights Campaign.

Published in Home Page

Attached a new fact sheet from Women's Refugee Commission, ABA Center on Children and the Law, and the Center on Immigration and Child Welfare that addresses frequently asked questions about separated children, parental rights, and the state child welfare system.

There is contact information therein if you have questions.

Thank you.

Scott Trowbridge, JD

ABA Center on Children and the Law

1040 Connecticut Ave 4th floor

Washington, D.C. 20036

202-662-1747

Published in Children's Justice Act

Resource Description

Discusses the importance of quality supervision that organizations can provide to staff members at risk for secondary traumatic stress (STS). This fact sheet identifies the core competencies for supervisors providing formal support to workers who are exposed to secondary trauma. It is intended to be a developmental assessment for supervisors, to help identify areas of need, and to guide the user to resources to strengthen those areas of competency.

Published in 2018
Published in Children's Justice Act
Wednesday, 18 July 2018 07:11

Complex Trauma Standardized Measures

Resource Description

Is a table of standardized measures that are appropriate for children and families dealing with complex trauma.

Published in 2018 - National Child Traumatic Stress Network
 
Published in Data & Technology
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